input-arrow input-arrow Stay at Home Order Frequently Asked Questions

On Sunday, March 22, under the direction of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton, M.D., MPH issued a director’s order to require all Ohioans to stay in their homes to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 beginning on Monday, March 23 until 11:59 p.m. on April 6. On April 2, Gov. DeWine announced that the order would be extended until May 1 at 11:59 p.m. This order prohibits holding gatherings of any size and closes all nonessential businesses. It does NOT prohibit essential activities like going to the grocery store, receiving medical care, or taking your pet for a walk. Residents can return home from out of state and can leave the state.

For more information on what this order means for you, please see below. For additional COVID-19 from the Ohio Department of Health, click here.

What is included in the extension of the Stay at Home Order?

The full Stay at Home order can be found here or on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

Updates to the new order include:

  • The creation of a dispute resolution process for situations where two local health departments have come to a different conclusion on what is or is not an essential business.
  • The requirement that essential businesses determine and enforce a maximum number of customers allowed in a store at one time.  These businesses must ensure that people waiting to enter the stores maintain safe social distancing.
  • Direction that travelers arriving to Ohio should self-quarantine for 14 days. Exceptions include persons who live and work in trans-border areas, heath care workers, public health workers, public safety workers, transportation workers and designated essential workers. Visitors are instructed not to travel to Ohio if they are displaying symptoms, excepting in certain circumstances for medical care.
  • The mandate that wedding receptions be limited to no more than 10 people.
  • A clarification to close campgrounds with the exception where a camper or recreational vehicle in a campground serves as a citizen’s permanent residence and they are unable to secure safe alternative housing.
  • The requirement that public swimming pools and swimming pools at private clubs or housing complexes close to prevent transmission of COVID-19.  This does not apply to private residential pools.
  • The clarification that retail garden centers can remain open but should determine and enforce a reduced capacity to keep customers and employees safe.
  • The closure of day camps for children.
  • The prohibition of organized youth and adult sports.
  • The clarification that fishing is permitted if proper social distancing is practiced.

Where does the Stay at Home order apply?

The director’s order includes the entire state. Unless you work for an essential business or are doing an essential activity, you should stay home. Work from home is permitted and encouraged where possible.

Is this mandatory or just guidance?

This order is mandatory. To help prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in Ohio and protect our friends, neighbors, and vulnerable populations, please stay home.

Will the Ohio National Guard be enforcing this order?

No. The Ohio National Guard will not be enforcing this order.

I work in an essential service. How will the police know I’m allowed to be outside my house?

Law enforcement officials will not stop residents who are on their way to or from work or who are out for necessities like going to the pharmacy or getting groceries, or just taking a walk. People gathering in any size group may be asked to physically distance themselves or go home. Ohioans should abstain from all nonessential activities. Adhering to the order will save lives and it is the responsibility of every Ohioan to do their part. We are in this together.

Will grocery stores be open?

Yes, essential businesses and operations outlined by the order include the following:

  • Stores that sell groceries and medicine
  • Food, beverage and licensed marijuana production and agriculture
  • Organizations that provide charitable and social services
  • Religious entities
  • Media
  • First amendment protected speech
  • Gas stations and businesses needed for transportation
  • Financial and insurance institutions
  • Hardware and supply stores
  • Critical trades
  • Mail, post, shipping logistics, delivery and pick-up services
  • Educational institutions
  • Laundry services
  • Restaurants for consumption off-premises
  • Supplies to work from home
  • Supplies for essential businesses and operations
  • Transportation
  • Home-based care and services
  • Residential facilities and shelters
  • Professional services
  • Manufacture, distribution and supply chain for critical products and industries
  • Critical labor union functions
  • Hotels and motels
  • Funeral services

How can I get medical care if I need it?

If you are feeling sick, call your doctor, a nurse hotline, any telehealth hotline set up specifically for COVID-19 (check with your insurance company) or an urgent care center. If you are experiencing symptoms or are currently in isolation, you should stay at home and follow the guidelines provided by your physician. Do not go to an emergency room unless necessary. Nonessential medical care like eye exams and teeth-cleaning should be postponed. When possible, healthcare visits should be done remotely. Contact your healthcare provider to see what tele-health services they provide.

Franklin County Public Health says that you should not go to the emergency room if your symptoms are not life threatening (e.g., unable to breathe, high fever that will not come down even when taking fever reducing medication). If you are contagious, you will potentially spread the disease to everyone in the ER. If you need ER services or an ambulance, please notify the dispatcher and/or ER staff that you are experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms. This will alert the healthcare providers and first responders to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep them and other patients safe.

What if I still have to go to work?

Unless your work is an essential function (i.e. healthcare provider, grocery store clerk, first responder), you should stay home. If you have been designated essential by your employer, you should continue to go to work and practice social distancing. If you are experiencing symptoms or are currently in isolation, you should stay at home and follow the guidelines provided by your physician.

What if I think my business should be closed but I’m still being asked to operate?

Essential businesses will remain open during the Stay at Home order to provide services that are vital to the lives of Ohioans. Those businesses include, but are not limited to, pharmacies, certain government offices, and restaurants providing take-out meals. If you work for an essential business, you should continue to practice social distancing and should stay at home outside of work hours. If you believe your business is nonessential but are still being asked to show up to work, you may discuss with your employer.

Can I order food/groceries?

Yes, grocery delivery will be available as well as meal-delivery, drive through, and take-out options.

Will public transportation and ridesharing be available?

Public transportation and ridesharing should be used for essential travel only. When possible, walk, or drive yourself.

Will roads in Ohio be closed?

No, the roads will not be closed in Ohio. You should only travel if it is essential to your work or health.

Can I take a flight out of state?

Planes and any other form of travel should only be used for essential purposes.

What if my home is not a safe environment?

If it is not safe for you to remain home, you are able and urged to find another safe place to stay during this order. Please reach out so we can help. You may call the Ohio Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-934-9840 or contact your local law enforcement.

Can I visit friends and family?

For your safety, as well as the safety of those in your community, you should remain at home to help fight the spread of COVID-19. However you may travel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons. If possible, it is recommended that you drop off supplies, food, and medication to those relatives in need of assistance, but minimize interaction.

What about my pet?

You may walk your dog and seek medical care for your pet should they require it. Be sure to practice social distancing while out on walks, maintaining at least 6 feet from other neighbors and their pets.

Does the Stay at Home order mean I can’t take my kids to the park?

Families will still be able to go outside, including to parks and outdoor spaces that remain open, and take a walk, run, or bike ride but should continue to practice social distancing by remaining 6 feet away from other people. Playgrounds are closed because they pose a high risk of increasing transmission.

What is the difference between the Stay at Home order and social distancing?

Social distancing is an important first step in preventing the spread of a disease like COVID-19 that allows people to go about their daily activities while taking extra health and safety precautions. The Stay at Home order requires people to remain in their homes unless they have an essential job or are doing an essential task like going to the grocery store or walking a pet.

Can I leave home to exercise?

Yes. Outdoor exercise like running or taking a walk is perfectly acceptable; however, exercise gyms, fitness centers and associated facilities are closed to reduce the spread of coronavirus. While exercising outside, you should still practice social distancing by running or walking at least six feet away from other people.

Can I pick up meals being provided by my child’s school?

Yes. Many districts and schools are continuing to support students by providing breakfast and lunch in non-congregate settings. To find a meal site near you, use the Ohio Department of Education’s interactive map or check your local district’s website or social media channels for meal distribution locations and times.

Can I go out to do laundry?

Yes. Laundromats, dry cleaners and laundry service providers are considered essential businesses that will remain open.

input-arrow input-arrow A Message from the Mayor and City Manager

March 24, 2020

Dear New Albany Community:

As part of the City’s commitment to keep you informed and up to date, we want to share with you that we have our first confirmed community case of COVID-19. The New Albany-Plain Local School District was notified this evening that a staff member has tested positive for COVID-19. This staff member works at the Early Learning Center. The school district provided a notice to all families in our school district to protect the safety and welfare of everyone. Since not all New Albany residents have students in our schools, we are sharing this information to try to make sure all New Albany residents know.

Franklin County Public Health (FCPH) has confirmed that they will contact parents/guardians of any child and any staff member who may have had direct contact with this person. FCPH has confirmed for our district that being in the Early Learning Center with this person who has tested positive for COVID-10 DOES NOT mean that everyone at the Early Learning Center has been exposed to COVID-19. Regardless, as recommended by FCPH, our school district will continue to thoroughly sanitize all facilities, including the Early Learning Center, prior to being occupied again.

HIPAA laws do not allow us to provide information beyond letting you know about the positive test, but know that we are working closely with FCPH and other local authorities to keep our community as safe as possible.

Based upon our discussions with FCPH and local health professionals in the community, it is important for everyone in the community to self-monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 (fever >100.4, cough, shortness of breath). Parents this is important for your entire family, especially your children. Research shows the majority of children are asymptomatic carriers, which means they may not exhibit any symptoms but still be able to pass the coronavirus onto loved ones, some of which may be very susceptible to the disease.

You do not need to contact FCPH if you have concerns or think you may have COVID-19 symptoms. Instead, contact your healthcare provider. You should not go to the emergency room if your symptoms are not life threatening (e.g., unable to breathe, high fever that will not come down even when taking fever reducing medication). If you are contagious, you will potentially spread the disease to everyone in the ER. If you need ER services or an ambulance, please notify the dispatcher and/or ER staff that you are experiencing COVID-19 like symptoms. This will alert the healthcare providers and first responders to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep them and other patients safe.

Any tests which come back with a positive result for COVID-19 will result in FCPH requiring close contacts of the individual to immediately self-quarantine and monitor themselves for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days. FCPH will not make this information public to preserve the privacy of the individuals involved.

The circumstances regarding the COVID-19 outbreak change quickly but we will continue to work with FCPH and be transparent to our public with whatever we find out. We encourage everyone to visit the CDC website, the City’s COVID-19 web page or the health department’s website for more information.

Remember that the best thing you can do in the face of COVID-19 is to take precautions to protect yourself, your family, and your community:

  • Stay at home in accordance with Ohio’s public health order.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Dry hands with a clean towel or air dry.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are unavailable.
  • Cover your mouth with a tissue or sleeve when sneezing or coughing.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surface areas in your home.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick.
  • Adhere to social/physical distancing recommendations.
  • Consult your healthcare provider with questions.

Let’s continue to remain positive and look out for our neighbors. If you are sick, please take care of yourself and stay home for a minimum of 7 days from when you became sick. You can return to your normal activities when:

  • A week has passed from symptom onset;
  • Your symptoms have improved; and
  • You have been fever free without taking fever reducing medications for 72 hours.

Whether you are sick or not, please remember to maintain proper social distancing for yourself, your family and your neighbors. This self-distancing is absolutely critical to reduce the potential of COVID-19 spread. We are all in this together!

Sincerely,

Sloan Spalding, Mayor
Joseph Stefanov, City Manager

input-arrow input-arrow Resources for Businesses

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the regional, state and federal governments have developed special information and resources for businesses.

input-arrow input-arrow Online Public Meetings

PER STATE-WIDE EMERGENCY, NO IN-PERSON ATTENDANCE IS PERMITTED AT PUBLIC MEETINGS

New Albany residents interested in attending any public meetings of our City Council or Boards and Commissions can attend these meetings online in order to follow the state’s Stay at Home Order. Learn more about how to connect online to these meetings by clicking here.

input-arrow input-arrow What To Do if You Are Sick

The following information is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). You can learn more by clicking here.

 

If you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick

Follow the steps below:  If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your home and community.

man in bed
Stay home except to get medical care
  • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
  • Avoid public areas: Do not go to work, school, or public areas.
  • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
family separated
Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home
  • Stay away from others: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom, if available.
  • Limit contact with pets & animals: You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus.
  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food. If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a facemask. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.
on the phone with doctor
Call ahead before visiting your doctor
  • Call ahead: If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.
man wearing a mask
Wear a facemask if you are sick
  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
  • If you are caring for others: If the person who is sick is not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then people who live with the person who is sick should not stay in the same room with them, or they should wear a facemask if they enter a room with the person who is sick.
woman covering their mouth when coughing
Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Cover: Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Dispose: Throw used tissues in a lined trash can.
  • Wash hands: Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or, if soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
washing hands
Clean your hands often
  • Wash hands: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
  • Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.
  • Soap and water: Soap and water are the best option if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching: Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
don't share
Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Do not share: You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home.
  • Wash thoroughly after use: After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.
cleaning a counter
Clean all “high-touch” surfaces everyday
  • Clean and disinfect: Practice routine cleaning of high touch surfaces.

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables.

  • Disinfect areas with bodily fluids: Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them.
  • Household cleaners: Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.
taking temperature
Monitor your symptoms
  • Seek medical attention: Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g., difficulty breathing).
  • Call your doctor: Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have, or are being evaluated for, COVID-19.
  • Wear a facemask when sick: Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting infected or exposed.
  • Alert health department: Ask your healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals, as appropriate.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personnel that you have, or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before emergency medical services arrive.

father playing with his son
Discontinuing home isolation
  • Stay at home until instructed to leave: Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider: The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.
input-arrow input-arrow How to Stay Healthy

The following information comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Illustration: woman sneezing on man
  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take steps to protect yourself

Illustration: washing hands with soap and water

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Illustration: Woman quarantined to her home

Avoid close contact

Take steps to protect others

man in bed

Stay home if you’re sick

woman covering their mouth when coughing

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
man wearing a mask

Wear a facemask if you are sick

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
cleaning a counter

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
input-arrow input-arrow Changes to Community Development Procedures

Modified Operating Procedures, Effective: March 24, 2020

In response to the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) “Stay at Home” order, we are modifying our department operations until further notice.  We are committed to doing our part to eliminate the Coronavirus (COVID-19) during this developing situation. We reserve the right to make changes to this policy as necessary to serve in the best interests of the health, safety and welfare of our citizens and employees.

Office:

  • Our office is closed for in-person visits. All meetings will be held via video or phone conferencing until further notice.
  • We can be reached at 614-939-2254 weekdays between the hours of 8 am to 5 pm for assistance.
  • In-person meetings will only be held as deemed necessary by staff by appointment only.

Drop-Off of Applications & Permits: 

  • Permits will only be accepted on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, between the hours of 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Permits delivered outside of this timeframe will not be accepted.
  • A large tote labeled “Permit Drop-Off” will be placed at the rear entrance of Village Hall from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Material must be submitted in the tote within this timeframe.
  • Upon arrival, you must call 614-939-2254 to inform counter staff of the materials submitted. Your phone call ensures that the material submitted will be promptly transported from the tote into the facility for further processing.  Failure to call may delay the processing timeline or potentially result in damaged materials.
  • We still need to receive the same number of copies of plans and all required items listed on the application.

Collection of Fees:

  • Discuss fees with the clerk when you call to drop-off. We will take credit card payment over the phone, or you may opt to mail a check.  A receipt will be mailed to you.

Pickup of Applications and Permits:

  • Pick-ups will be done by appointment only on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, between the hours of 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • We ask that you call ahead thirty (30) minutes to schedule your pick-up appointment and verify that fees are paid.
  • Call us again at 614-939-2254 when you arrive to pick-up your items from the rear (parking lot side) of the building.
  • Your material may already be placed inside the “pick-up” tote, or depending on the situation, we may decide to bring it out to you upon your arrival.

 

Residential & Commercial Inspections: 

  • Please continue to call the inspection line at 614-939-2222 to schedule inspections.
  • All inspections will be conducted remotely with photos, livestreaming, or by a telephone conference to the furthest extent practical. The inspector and caller can work out the details on a project specific basis.
  • When physical inspections are necessary, there must be an absolute minimum number of people proximate to the inspection area, preferably no more than one person.
  • The contractor shall ensure that the inspector has unrestricted access into and out of the site and that proper social distancing is provided at all times.
  • Replacement of existing building equipment such as furnaces, air conditioners, and hot water heaters will not be inspected in occupied buildings at this time. Permits are still required for this work in order to document changes and our inspectors will return to perform the inspections at a later date.
  • An inspector may ask several questions relating to the health and well-being of individuals located within the inspection area and has the authority to cancel an inspection at any time if he feels that his health is at risk.
  • The City will only perform virtual inspections on construction sites that report a worker with a case of COVID-19 for 14 days following notification of infection.
input-arrow input-arrow City Services

The City of New Albany remains open for business and will continue to provide police patrol and essential city services. However, we must temporarily restrict public access to Village Hall and our Public Service building to comply with social distancing restrictions. The City of New Albany encourages residents to use online options and telephone calls for interactions with City staff whenever possible. With that in mind, we have made additional changes to our Community Development procedures, including inspections, applications, permits and collection of fees. Click here to learn more. 

At this time, New Albany police will cease providing civilian fingerprinting service to the community due to concerns surrounding COVID-19. This does not impact any fingerprinting needed for law enforcement purposes or law enforcement employment. Police will also be restricting some activities that are not mission critical. Requests for group tours of the facility, speaking engagements, Block Watch, distracted driving demonstrations and female self-defense classes are a few of the services that police are suspending until further notice. At this time, the police lobby will remain open.  We will continue to monitor developments, communicate with health officials and implement measures aimed at protecting the health and well-being of both police staff and the public.

New Albany’s Mayor’s Court is temporarily closed until May 27.  All pending cases will be rescheduled until May 27 or later.  Written notices will be mailed to defendants and attorneys in every case providing them with the new court date.  Mayor’s Court staff will continue to be available by telephone, US Mail, and email (court@newalbanyohio.org) during normal business hours. Payable citations may be paid online, by mail or at the 24-hour drop box located near the flagpole behind Village Hall, 99 West Main Street.  No cash or credit card payments are accepted in the drop box.  Motions and other court filings may be submitted via email or US Mail during this closure period.  We will continue to evaluate the coronavirus situation and take such other actions as deemed appropriate. Please call (614) 855-8577 with any questions.

input-arrow input-arrow Closures

Area closures include the following:

input-arrow input-arrow COTA Services
  • Line 45 – As of March 24, COTA announced they are suspending Line 45 until further notice. New Albany Rush Hour service is to be reduced to one (1) morning (AM) trip and one (1) evening (PM) trip on weekdays effective Thursday, March 19, 2020 until further notice. Real-time mobility apps such as Transit, Google Maps, and others may not show correct schedule times for this line during service changes. Click here to learn more about the Line 45 New Albany service. 
  • COTA is temporarily suspending fare collection for all trips and is requesting customers to limit non-essential bus travel until further notice. They are asking all customers to enter and exit through the rear doors to encourage social distancing and to keep everyone safe. For more information, visit COTA’s website or call COTA’s Customer Care Center at (614) 228-1776.
input-arrow input-arrow New Albany Food Pantry

The New Albany Food Pantry is working with the NAPLS District to help students who will be affected by the three-week Spring Break extension. To ensure that families have ample provisions the pantry will be collecting the items listed below.

Non-perishable food donations can be dropped off to donation bins located at the Heit Center (150 W. Main St. New Albany, OH) during normal business hours. If you would like to make a monetary donation, please visit their website by clicking here. The New Albany Food Pantry also has a wish-list on Amazon. You can conveniently shop online and donate items by clicking here. Donated items will be shipped directly to the Heit Center.

Requested Donations:

  • $25 gift card to local grocery stores
  • Cereal
  • Oatmeal
  • Loaves of bread
  • Bagels
  • Jelly
  • Canned fruit – pineapple/mixed fruit
  • Macaroni
  • Microwavable Chef Boyardee products
  • Spaghetti
  • Plastic jars of spaghetti sauce
  • Granola bars
  • Chicken breast in cans
  • Tuna in cans
  • Chicken noodle soup
  • Tomato soup
  • Ramen noodles
  • Fruit snacks
  • Raisins
  • Healthy snacks
  • Crackers
  • Can openers

New Albany Connects: New Albany Food Pantry from NewAlbany Ohio on Vimeo.

input-arrow input-arrow Rumpke

Trash and recycling service from Rumpke continues as normal. However, Rumpke is taking additional steps to ensure the safety of its team members and its customers. The following are steps that New Albany residents can also take to prevent the spread of disease:

  • Bag all of your trash. This reduces employee exposure to items like used tissues and other personal hygiene products.
  • Place trash at the curb the night before scheduled service.
  • Continue to place recycling in your bin loose. Ensure only the correct items are placed in recycling containers. Remember items like trash bags and grocery bags, tissues, napkins and paper cups aren’t accepted.
  • Properly dispose of medical sharps. Medical sharps used to administer medication to individuals or pets should be placed in a rigid plastic container, clearly marked “Sharps”, sealed shut and placed in trash.

This continues to be an evolving situation, and Rumpke says that it will continue to adjust its policies and procedures in accordance with recommendations from national and local authorities to ensure the safety of its employees and its customers.

input-arrow input-arrow The President's Coronavirus Guidelines
The President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America:
15 Days to Slow the Spread
 
1)      Listen to and follow the directions of your state and local authorities.
 
2)     If you feel sick, stay home.  Do not go to work.  Contact your medical provider.
 
3)     If your children are sick, keep them at home.  Do not send them to school.  Contact your medical provider.
 
4)     If someone in your household has tested positive for the coronavirus, keep the entire household at home.  Do not go to work.  Do not go to school.  Contact your medical provider.
 
5)      If you are an older person, stay home and away from other people.
 
6)     If you are a person with a serious underlying health condition that can put you at increased risk (for example, a condition that impairs your lung or heart function or weakens your immune system), stay home and away from other people.
 
7)      Even if you are young, or otherwise healthy, you are at risk and your activities can increase the risk for others. It is critical that you do your part to stop the spread of the coronavirus:
a.       Work or engage in schooling from home whenever possible.
b.      If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule.  You and your employers should follow CDC guidance to protect your health at work.
c.       Avoid social gatherings in groups of more than 10 people.
d.      Avoid eating or drinking in bars, restaurants, and food courts – use drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options.
e.       Avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips, and social visits.
f.        Do not visit nursing homes or retirement or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance.
 
8)     Practice good hygiene:
a.       Wash your hands, especially after touching any frequently used item or surface.
b.      Avoid touching your face.
c.       Sneeze or cough into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow.
d.      Disinfect frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible.
 
* School operations can accelerate the spread of the coronavirus.  Governors of states with evidence of community transmission should close schools in affected and surrounding areas.  Governors should close schools in communities that are near areas of community transmission, even if those areas are in neighboring states.  In addition, state and local officials should close schools where coronavirus has been identified in the population associated with the school.  States and localities that close schools need to address childcare needs of critical responders, as well as the nutritional needs of children.
 
** Older people are particularly at risk from the coronavirus.  All states should follow Federal guidance and halt social visits to nursing homes and retirement and long-term care facilities.
 
*** In states with evidence of community transmission, bars, restaurants, food courts, gyms, and other indoor and outdoor venues where groups of people congregate should be closed.
input-arrow input-arrow Archived Updates

Update: Thursday, April 2 at 2:19 p.m.

Gov. Mike DeWine has announced that the current Stay at Home Order originally set to expire on April 6 will be extended until May 1 at 11:59 p.m. You can read details of the extended order by clicking here.

Update: March 30 

*331 positive cases in central Ohio, including New Albany
*3 deaths in central Ohio
*Please stop socializing in groups outside of your immediate family. Your actions impact everyone!

Update: March 28 

Dr. Amy Acton: “For those of you who know me, I’d rather be out digging in the dirt. We want you to go outside, get out there in nature — at a social distance. “

Governor DeWine encouraged the FDA to approve new technology from Battelle that could sterilize up to 80,000 surgical masks a day.

Update: March 27 at 2:15 p.m.

Governor Mike DeWine has signed House Bill 197.

“This bill will ensure continuity of government, extended mail-in voting for our primary, clarity for schools and students, relief to workers impacted by COVID-19, and measures to make sure we are prepared to help Ohioans get back to work when this pandemic subsides. I applaud the collaborative work on this bill.”

Update: Tuesday, March 24 at 9:14 p.m.

The City of New Albany and New Albany-Plain Local Schools confirmed the first positive COVID-19 test to the public. The city’s full letter to the public can be viewed here.

Update: Monday, March 23 at 3:35 p.m.

The City of New Albany remains open for business and will continue to provide police patrol and essential city services. However, we must temporarily restrict public access to Village Hall and our Public Service building to comply with social distancing restrictions. With that in mind, we have made additional changes to our Community Development procedures, including inspections, applications, permits and collection of fees. Click here to learn more.

Update: Sunday, March 22 at 2:40 p.m.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced that Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton has signed a statewide Stay at Home order for Ohioans. The order can be enforced by local health departments and law enforcement. It will go into effect at 11:59 p.m. on Monday, March 23 and will remain in effect until April 6 when it will be reassessed. Both Gov. DeWine and Dr. Acton stressed maintaining social distancing and proper health precautions. The full order can be read here.

“This is an order, but it’s a reasonable order that is consistent with what has to be done,” Gov. DeWine said. “If everyone cooperates we’ll save a lot of lives. The healthcare system won’t get overwhelmed. Use common sense.”

Gov. DeWine said that people can still leave their homes to take care of others, to make trips to grocery stores, carry-out restaurants and other businesses for essential supplies, and to get outside for fresh air. The governor reminded Ohioans that parks are open but that playgrounds are closed due to the risk that they pose. Also, all childcare centers, beginning on Thursday, must operate under a Temporary Pandemic Child Care license and can only have a maximum of 6 children per room.

Update: Friday, March 20 at 10:30 a.m.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon Husted today announced that the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved their request to allow small businesses and nonprofits in Ohio to apply for low-interest, long-term loans of up to $2 million through the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program. Click here to learn more. You can also access a presentation that provides further guidance for the loan application by clicking here.

Update: Thursday, March 19 at 3:30 p.m.

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a proclamation that will activate approximately 300 personnel from the Ohio National Guard to support efforts due to COVID-19. According to a press release, the soldiers will support the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and the Ohio Association of Foodbanks around Ohio. They will be transporting, packaging and distributing food to home in vulnerable areas, community-based locations and partner agencies in rural counties.

Update: Wednesday, March 18 at 2:40 p.m.

Governor Mike DeWine has announced the closure of barbershops, beauty salons, tattoo parlors, hair salons and nail salons. The state will also be closing 181 BMV registrar locations. Five will remain open because they are essential to issue/renew commercial drivers’ licenses to keep the transportation system moving. Gov. DeWine is asking law enforcement to not issue tickets for someone who has an expired license due to the fact that they can no longer get a renewal.

Update: Tuesday, March 17 at 4:15 p.m.

Governor Mike DeWine has announced that the State Health Director would issue an order requiring hospitals to postpone elective surgeries in an effort to make sure there continues to be enough hospital beds in the state.

Update: Tuesday, March 17 at 8 a.m.

Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton has ordered Tuesday’s polls closed as a health emergency, postponing the completion of the primary in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Update: Monday, March 16 at 8 p.m.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has announced an order to close gyms, fitness centers, recreation centers, bowling alleys, indoor water parks, movie theaters, and trampoline parks across the state until further notice.

Update: Monday, March 16 at 9 a.m.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine has announced that the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) has issued a Director’s Order that will close all Ohio bars and restaurants to in-house patrons. Restaurants with take-out and delivery options will still be able to operate those services, even as their dining rooms are temporarily closed.